Laudate si: wonder and care

The Valley of the Gods in southeastern Utah by Betsey Crawford

The Valley of the Gods in southeastern Utah

Laudate si — Praise be! — are the opening words of each of the verses in Saint Francis’s beautiful Canticle to the Sun, and is also the title of Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical defining the Catholic Church’s doctrines on the care of the earth. A couple of weeks ago, I found out from a blogger friend that September 1 has been chosen as the annual World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation, joining a tradition started by the Orthodox Church in 1989. Since I’m always ready to celebrate the earth, I thought I would read the revolutionary encyclical, which covers many topics, all relating to the care of ecosystems, and the belief that all livings things have dignity and worth beyond their use to humanity.

Always reflecting Pope Francis’ deep concern for the plight of the poor, the lengthy letter ranges from the devastation of war and the insidious consequences of political corruption, to the dignity and necessity of meaningful work, to the need for orderly and inviting living conditions. He issues a call for new models of development, starting with the cooperative efforts of small villages and extending to complex global treaties involving all the countries of the world. He calls for a release of consumerism. He even takes the time to urge his readers to return to the small celebration of saying grace before meals, and talks about the importance of appreciating beauty, so that we will want to preserve it.

That, naturally, is where I come in. To join in a day meant to contemplate the glories of creation, and our role in caring for them, I’ve interwoven some of Pope Francis’ words with pictures of the great luminous beauty of our world.

We have forgotten that we ourselves are dust of the earth; our very bodies are made up of her elements, we breathe her air and we receive life and refreshment from her waters.

Monkshood (Aconitum delphinifolium) at the Wynn Nature Center in Homer, Alaska by Betsey Crawford

Monkshood (Aconitum delphinifolium) at the Wynn Nature Center in Homer, Alaska

It is not enough, however, to think of different species merely as potential “resources” to be exploited, while overlooking the fact that they have value in themselves. Each year sees the disappearance of thousands of plant and animal species which we will never know, which our children will never see, because they have been lost for ever. The great majority become extinct for reasons related to human activity. Because of us, thousands of species will no longer…convey their message to us. We have no such right.

Pacific trillium (Trillium ovatum) in Blithedale Canyon, Larkspur, California by Betsey Crawford

Pacific trillium (Trillium ovatum) in Blithedale Canyon, Larkspur, California

It may well disturb us to learn of the extinction of mammals or birds, since they are more visible. But the good functioning of ecosystems also requires fungi, algae, worms, insects, reptiles and an innumerable variety of microorganisms. Some less numerous species, although generally unseen, nonetheless play a critical role in maintaining the equilibrium of a particular place.

Strawberry hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus stamineus) in Cross Canyon, southwestern Colorado by Betsey Crawford

Strawberry hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus stamineus) in Cross Canyon, southwestern Colorado

Because all creatures are connected, each must be cherished with love and respect, for all of us as living creatures are dependent on one another. Each area is responsible for the care of this family.

Wild geranium (Geranium erianthum) at the Wynn Nature Center in Homer, Alaska by Betsey Crawford

Wild geranium (Geranium erianthum) at the Wynn Nature Center in Homer, Alaska

We were not meant to be inundated by cement, asphalt, glass and metal, and deprived of physical contact with nature.

Grass of Parnassus (Parnassia palustris) in Peterson Bay, Homer, Alaska by Betsey Crawford

Grass of Parnassus (Parnassia palustris) in Peterson Bay, Homer, Alaska

In some countries, there are positive examples of environmental improvement: rivers, polluted for decades, have been cleaned up; native woodlands have been restored; landscapes have been beautified thanks to environmental renewal projects; beautiful buildings have been erected; advances have been made in the production of non-polluting energy and in the improvement of public transportation. These achievements do not solve global problems, but they do show that men and women are still capable of intervening positively. For all our limitations, gestures of generosity, solidarity and care cannot but well up within us, since we were made for love.

The sun emerges from under the clouds as it sets in Donald, British Columbia by Betsey Crawford

The sun emerges from under the clouds as it sets in Donald, British Columbia

Nowadays we must forcefully reject the notion that…dominion over the earth (Genesis 1:28) justifies absolute domination over other creatures. The biblical texts are to be read in their context, with an appropriate hermeneutic, recognizing that they tell us to “till and keep” the garden of the world (Genesis 2:15). “Tilling” refers to cultivating, ploughing or working, while “keeping” means caring, protecting, overseeing and preserving. This implies a relationship of mutual responsibility between human beings and nature. Each community can take from the bounty of the earth whatever it needs for subsistence, but it also has the duty to protect the earth and to ensure its fruitfulness for coming generations.

Canyon sunflower (Venegasia carpesioides) in the Charmlee Wilderness in the Santa Monica Mountains, Malibue, California by Betsey Crawford

Canyon sunflower (Venegasia carpesioides) in the Charmlee Wilderness in the Santa Monica Mountains, California

All of us are linked by unseen bonds and together form a kind of universal family, a sublime communion which fills us with a sacred, affectionate and humble respect.

David Austin rose in the rose garden in Manito Park, Spokane, Washington by Betsey Crawford

David Austin rose in the rose garden in Manito Park, Spokane, Washington

It cannot be emphasized enough how everything is interconnected. Time and space are not independent of one another, and not even atoms or subatomic particles can be considered in isolation. Just as the different aspects of the planet – physical, chemical and biological – are interrelated, so too living species are part of a network which we will never fully explore and understand. A good part of our genetic code is shared by many living beings. It follows that the fragmentation of knowledge and the isolation of bits of information can actually become a form of ignorance, unless they are integrated into a broader vision of reality.

Baneberry (Actea rubra) in Settlers Grove of Ancient Cedars in Murray, Idaho by Betsey Crawford

Baneberry (Actea rubra) in Settlers Grove of Ancient Cedars in Murray, Idaho

We take these ecosystems into account not only to determine how best to use them, but also because they have an intrinsic value independent of their usefulness. Each organism, as a creature of God, is good and admirable in itself; the same is true of the harmonious ensemble of organisms existing in a defined space and functioning as a system. Although we are often not aware of it, we depend on these larger systems for our own existence. We need only recall how ecosystems interact in dispersing carbon dioxide, purifying water, controlling illnesses and epidemics, forming soil, breaking down waste, and in many other ways which we overlook or simply do not know about. Once they become conscious of this, many people realize that we live and act on the basis of a reality which has previously been given to us, which precedes our existence and our abilities. So, when we speak of “sustainable use”, consideration must always be given to each ecosystem’s regenerative ability in its different areas and aspects.

Sticky geranium (Geranium viscosissimum) in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta by Betsey Crawford

Sticky geranium (Geranium viscosissimum) in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta

But if these issues are courageously faced, we are led inexorably to ask other pointed questions: What is the purpose of our life in this world? Why are we here? What is the goal of our work and all our efforts? What need does the earth have of us? It is no longer enough, then, simply to state that we should be concerned for future generations. We need to see that what is at stake is our own dignity. Leaving an inhabitable planet to future generations is, first and foremost, up to us. The issue is one which dramatically affects us, for it has to do with the ultimate meaning of our earthly sojourn.

Autumn leaves in the orchard at Genesis Farm, Blairstown, New Jersey by Betsey Crawford

Autumn leaves in the orchard at Genesis Farm, Blairstown, New Jersey

May our struggles and our concern for this planet never take away the joy of our hope.

Cook Inlet from Captain Cook State Park in Kenai, Alaska by Betsey Crawford

Cook Inlet from Captain Cook State Park in Kenai, Alaska

I’d love to have you on the journey! If you add your email address, I’ll send you notices of new adventures.

13 Comments

  1. Mary September 12, 2016 at 5:57 am #

    Grazie! That was an awesome and prayerful reflection!

    • Betsey September 18, 2016 at 4:27 pm #

      Thank you, Mary!

    • Betsey October 15, 2016 at 12:07 pm #

      Thank you so much, Mary.

  2. Megan Rice September 4, 2016 at 1:02 pm #

    I do hope that this collection of illustrations for Ladate Si will have been made available to Francis himself?

    • Betsey September 6, 2016 at 9:09 am #

      That’s a lovely idea, Megan. Do you know how to do that?

  3. Betty Webster September 2, 2016 at 10:19 pm #

    The whole thing is wonderful—–Autumn leaves lighting is spectacular!!

    • Betsey September 6, 2016 at 9:09 am #

      Thanks so much, Betty!

  4. Kathy September 1, 2016 at 8:05 pm #

    Love this – thank you for sharing!

    • Betsey September 6, 2016 at 9:10 am #

      Thank you, Kathy!

  5. Carol Nicklaus September 1, 2016 at 9:51 am #

    Yes,,, I especially love “…a sacred affection and humble respect…”

    And the luminosity of your images is so full of life and grace…

    MLAA

    • Betsey September 6, 2016 at 9:11 am #

      Thank you, my dear. I love that line, too.

  6. Ann September 1, 2016 at 8:18 am #

    Wow — so beautiful!!!

    💖🌟💖🌟💖🌟💖🌟💖

    • Betsey September 6, 2016 at 9:11 am #

      Thanks so much, Annie!